Water

Water

 

The photos of Marijn de Jong are characterised by a distinct visual language, which is further strengthened through an absence of colour. It is what it is – but what is it then? Black and white, now that colour is standard in photography, seems to be a choice to make it difficult for the viewer by simplifying the image. But this is not the case: black and white photography has an especially rich spectrum of grey tones, which force you to look closely. Colour offers information, but in addition provides reassurance: everything is as we ourselves are able to perceive it. Black and white imagery requires your own completion, interpretation and consideration. Just as in this photo, simply titled ‘water’. Whereby the question is even if it is a black and white image. At some moments in a day there is such little light that colours are barely perceivable and the reality presents itself to us in grey tones.

 

In this photo we’re unable to see much: some black forms, reeds, or grasses, along the banks of the water, or a watercourse. A gully for example, that disperses in the distance into a lake or the air – we’re uncertain and loose ourselves therefore perhaps in the distance of this landscape that is almost a painting – or a photo from the early years of photography when, due to technical constraints, not everything could be captured entirely sharply. How surprising it is that now it is a choice to photograph with such an unsharp quality, the professionalism and visual abilities of Marijn de Jong become apparent in this almost dream-like image. Its suggestion of depth and distance gives this image its strength. Just as he, contrariwise, in other works singles out a flawless registration of rhythms and forms (see ‘strandbal’ / ‘beach-ball’ next to his artist statement), in an image such as this he can also express his qualities: forming a perplexing image, wherein it seems you’re unable to see anything, but wherein you can in fact loose yourself.

 

Anthon Fasel

 

fotograaf: 
Marijn de Jong